ABC AND CBS SCHOOL US ON WHEN NOT TO PROTECT A WHISTLEBLOWER – IT’S PRETTY SIMPLE

by James A. Wilson

Whistleblowers are by definition people with inside information about government or corporate misconduct, obtained because they are insiders. By function they are people who go public with that information; going public puts jobs, careers, and sometimes freedom at risk.

Real whistleblowers perform invaluable public service; without them we would not know of tobacco and liquor companies’ efforts to target young people for smoking and drinking. We would be blissfully ignorant of the (known) health hazards of asbestos, carcinogens and other chemicals in use that can sicken and kill those exposed. On the government front, we would not know of the incredible incompetence and monumental deception of the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations in the conduct of the Vietnam War; credit Whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg. Without Whistleblower Edward Snowden we would remain in the dark about the extent our own government spies on us.

Whistleblowers are protected by federal law from retaliation when they expose corruption or other illegal activity…except when those they expose have the power to persecute despite the protections. Edward Snowden remains a fugitive under indictment for violating the Espionage Act; even Donald Trump wants him brought to justice instead of being honored as a champion of justice. Thankfully one of the great benefits of the First Amendment is the journeyman work media can do advocating for whistleblowers…except when the whistle is being blown on them. Consider the ABC and CBS television networks.

Amy Robach is an on-air personality for ABC News; Ashley Bianco is a former ABC producer and now a former producer for CBS. Robach obtained, vetted, and produced the Jeffrey Epstein story some three years before it broke. Her network refused to run the story in the face of her repeated pleas; there were too many powerful people involved – and lucrative sources of revenue for the network. Robach complained on a hot mic and the network archived the recording. Today anyone can watch and listen to her rant on YouTube because a whistleblower released the tape. The whistleblower had been identified as Ashley Bianco – Bianco denies it – who left ABC and went to work for CBS. Where the rubber meets the road is ABC called CBS to rat out its former employee and CBS fired her after five days on the job in retaliation for alleged whistle blowing.

That’s the rubber; here is the rub: All of the networks have been trumpeting about the sanctity of whistleblowers everywhere, and especially the one who stands at the heart of current presidential impeachment proceedings. Yet two have colluded to suppress vital public information and repress a whistleblower about a serial pedophile and his associates reaching all the way into the royal House of Windsor and back to the Clinton dynasty – if allegations prove out. Never mind the way to prove or disprove allegations is to bring evidence into the light of day – both the exposing and the exonerating kind.

For media giants to bring their considerable resources to bear on hiding rather than revealing what it knows is counter-productive and just what whistleblower shield laws are designed to combat. How dare they call themselves guardians of truth at the same time they are dedicated to suppressing it? How dare they school the rest of us in the care and feeding – and protection – of a presidential whistleblower?

For media giants to bring their considerable resources to bear on hiding rather than revealing what it knows is counter-productive and just what whistleblower shield laws are designed to combat. How dare they call themselves guardians of truth at the same time they are dedicated to suppressing it? How dare they school the rest of us in the care and feeding – and protection – of a presidential whistleblower?

There is a catch; protection is not automatic or in all cases. The law speaks of reasonable belief; it refers to honesty and responsibility in the same breath. In addition the federal False Claims Act remains on the books, adopted by Congress during the Civil War and sometimes known as Lincoln’s Law. It provides serious penalties for anyone who knowingly falsifies a whistleblower claim.

In that light, let us proceed with the impeachment process. If prosecutors can prove anything they claim – and prove it a relevant case of presidential wrongdoing – let the chips fall where they may. If the whistleblower – and those who have used this report for their own exploitive purposes – are found to be the liars they appear to be, let them bear the full weight of legal consequence for conspiring against our elected president.

While we are at it, let the media repent; the jury is already in on CBS, ABC, NBC, and a host of others. Let them earn back the respect of a public who more and more sees the nakedness of this emperor.

Last but not least, let us all beg God’s mercy. None of us is so good we can afford to live without it; the good news is none of us so evil we would be required to.

James A. Wilson is the author of Living As Ambassadors of Relationships, The Holy Spirit and the End Times, Kingdom in Pursuit, and his first novel, Generation – available at Bounty Books, or at praynorthstate@gmail.com

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